Is there life after a Separation Agreement


#1

Did you have your lawyer read it before you signed?


#2

Good question. Never, never, never sign a contract without your lawyer reading it when it deals with rights that could affect the rest of your life. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#3

I thought inhertances weren’t considered community property and therefore, not included when it came to division of equatable goods?


#4

I believe that it is more of the fact that your spouse asked for the inhertances. It was placed in your separation agreement and you agreed.


#5

Dear Jumper and Odyssey:

First, North Carolina is an EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION state, not community property. Now, the general rule is that inheritances are separate property. You can divide even separate assets in a separation agreement if you want to, although most people do not decide to do this. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#6

I believe I have made the mistake of signing a separation agreement that I believe now not to be equitable. As many may know, this is a very emotional time and my mental state during the beginning of the separation was definately questionable. Is there any recourse for this type of mistake? This includes adding my spouse to an inheritance account so now he owns 1/2 of that as well. Would legal counsel be prudent at this juncture or am I in the weeds??? Help!
Thanks!!!

lori pernell