Old custody agreement vs. new one


#1

Dear Colep1:

Greetings. The best way to resolve this is to file a motion to determine who should have the deduction. Thank you.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
919.787.6668 main phone
919.256.1665 direct fax

10925 David Taylor Drive, Suite 100
Charlotte, North Carolina 28262
704.644.2831 main voice
704.307.4595 main fax

ROSENDIVORCE.COM

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

Dear Janet:

Thank you for your response. Would filing a motion just be some thing concrete and in writing rather than absolutely necessary? I thought under NC Child Custody “statutes”, it was an understood guideline that if you retained full physical custody, you are able to file child as a deduction? Please explain if I’m confused. Thank you and have a very happy Mother’s Day![:)]


#3

Dear Colep1:

Greetings. First, I also wanted to wish you a happy Mother’s Day.

Now, when you have an order dictating who will have the tax deduction, unless that provision is changed, the order is the guiding point. Since your new order does not deal with this, a simple motion should help to gain you the deduction.

No, I definitely think that you have to file the motion to ensure that you are filing your taxes correctly. The sooner, the better. Thank you.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
919.787.6668 main phone
919.256.1665 direct fax

10925 David Taylor Drive, Suite 100
Charlotte, North Carolina 28262
704.644.2831 main voice
704.307.4595 main fax

ROSENDIVORCE.COM

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

Hello:

Back in 1999, my husband and his ex-wife got together with their attorneys and drew up a Consent Order for child custody giving them joint legal and joint physical custody of their daughter, Maggie. In that order, they specified weekly and Holiday visitation, issues dealing with the care of Maggie and how they were going to handle filing their taxes every year claiming Maggie as a dependent. They all signed the document, as well as a judge and it was filed. They agreed on alternating every year and the paragraph was written:
That based upon the agreement and stipulation by and between the parties hereto, for federal and state income tax purposes in any year in which the parties hereto do not file joint returns, the Plantiff and Defendant(ex-wife) will alternate claiming the minor child as a dependent.
After that 1999 order, my husband and his ex-wife did not agree that the order was in Maggie’s best interest and each wanted full custody. In August 2002, both parties consented to having an Arbitrator determine child custody. The Arbitrator conducted an invesigation and in October 2002 concluded that my husband would have Primary Physical Custody of Maggie and share Joint Legal Custody with his ex-wife. She is entitled to visitation every other weekend and specified Holiday visitation. His ex-wife also pays us child support.
In this current Arbitration Order it did not specify any thing about who can claim Maggie as a dependent on their taxes every year. My husband and I assumed that since we have Maggie more than 50% of the year, we have the right to claim Maggie every year and have been doing so since the 2002 order was signed by the Arbitrator, then a judge and filed. We also contacted the IRS with this matter and were asked the questions surrounding verification of who can claim Maggie as a dependent and felt that we are entitled.
My husband’s ex-wife, however, seems to believe that since there was a specific mention in the 1999 Joint Physical and Legal Custody Order dealing with alternating tax years and not any thing mentioned specifically in this current order that she has a right to claim Maggie as a dependent every other year and is going to do so.
So, my question is this: Even though there is no mention of filing taxes and claiming Maggie as a dependent in this current order which my husband now has Primary Physical Custody, is it understood that he is the only one to claim her, being the custodial parent? And that this current order supercedes the prior one on custody as well as the other issues stated in that 1999 order? Is she in the wrong to be claiming her now that joint physical custody has been dissolved?
Please give me your legal advice since this frustrating matter interfers with my husband and I claiming our taxes jointly every year.
I would aprreciate your advice greatly!