Discovery dilemma


#1

Dear alljams:

Greetings. We deal with many appraisers who know they may have to testify in court, so keep calling around to certified appraisers in your area.

Now, two things … first, why not tell her that she can have the property for that value and give you your half in cash? Next, you need a separate appraisal of your own.

No, I do not think tha tyou can use the evidence of comparable sales as you probably are not an expert in the real estate field. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorcecom
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

I’m beginning to learn a lot from this forum…As a matter of fact, before this post was even answered, I asked for my attorney to write up a proposal this morning saying she can have the property, and I take remaining assets… This will make our division of property equal, according to her “appraisal”…You guys are the best, will let you know how it turns out…

Thanks !!!


#3

Dear alljams:

Thanks. Good luck…and please do let us know!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

This is in regard to an “over-inflated” appraisal of a piece of property…This is from my ex’s attorney…Small rural setting, less than 1 acre, no building, and they state this is worth 100k !!! I tried finding an apprasier, but most said they were too busy, or didn’t want to get involved (divorce)…This appraisal she has was done in 2002…I have documentation from the register’s office about property that was bought less than a quarter mile from there,2 months ago, same situation, only 23,000 per acre…Can I use this in court ??