Guam divorce


#1

Child custody needs to be handled here.

It is a violation of the NC Rules of Professional Conduct to advise you as to how to obain a divorce in a foreigh jurisdiction. Bottom line - don’t do it. Our system in NC will get you a divorce in a reasonable amount of time.

Good luck.

Lee S. Rosen
Board Certified Family Law Specialist
The Rosen Law Firm
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
Rosen.com
(919)787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

Thanks for your response.


#3

“It is a violation of the NC Rules of Professional Conduct to advise you as to how to obain a divorce in a foreigh jurisdiction. Bottom line - don’t do it.”

By foreign, I assume you mean outside North Carolina, as Guam is a US territory and thus subject to the laws of the US, isn’t it? Reciprocally, I belive US courts have to recognize Guam courts’ rulings don’t they, just as of one is divorced in North Carolina, one may move to Florida and have that divorce recognized as legitimate even if not granted by a Florida court. If A Guam (US) divorce were NOT recognized in NC, wouldn’t this open a huge can of legal worms as every US state and territory could choose to recognize or not recognize another’s divorce decree, and half the country would be guilty of polygamy… ?


#4

Here is a link to some info. It does say something about 90 days to be spent in Guam after the divorce but that the courts do not question this. Only the two parties involved can question it. It seems you may open a can of worms if your spouse changes their mind afterwards.

guamdivorces.com/law_changes.htm

Good luck
MP


#5

Dear polara:

Greetings. Within the United States we have the full faith and credit clause of the Constitution which mandates that we follow judgments of another state. Thank you.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Law Firm

4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
919.787.6668 main phone
919.256.1665 direct fax

10925 David Taylor Drive, Suite 100
Charlotte, North Carolina 28262
704.644.2831 main voice
704.307.4595 main fax

1829 East Franklin Street, Bldg 600
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
919.321.0780 main phone
919.787.6668 main fax

ROSEN.COM

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#6

I was wondering if any of the attorneys had any ideas about the legitimacy of getting a divorce through the Guam court system? Many websites claim that a “quick” divorce can be done this way no matter where you reside in the US and without any length of separation. How would child custody/support issues be handled with a divorce through Guam? Any expert opinions on this method of obtaining a legal divorce?