Annulment?


#1

Impotence means -

Incapable of sexual intercourse, often because of an inability to achieve or sustain an erection

Are you impotent?

If not, then the annulment is not an option. Good luck.

Lee S. Rosen
Board Certified Family Law Specialist
The Rosen Law Firm
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCdivorce.com
(919)787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

In short, yes. There was a problem with the vasectomy, and as a result, I have been diagnosed with a condition called hypogonadism at the ripe old age of 37. I am currently under the care of an endocrinologist and undergoing hormone replacement therepy. My testosterone levels (both free and total - very low) have been evaluated by both the urologist who performed the procedure and the endocrinologist. Their response was “stuff happens, sorry.” considering this fact, I believe I could effectively argue impotence as my life is now upside down (you would not believe how dependent men’s bodies are on testosterone).

Thus, back to my question - if this is possible, how would I proceed with an annulment?


#3

Dear Telecomtodd:

Greetings. Sorry to hear about the medical complications you are suffering. If you were impotent at the time of your marriage, then the statute claims that your marriage is void. Therefore, yes, you should be able to void your marriage. You may need a letter from your treating physician claiming that you were impotent at the time of the marriage.

You file for an annulment by filing the proper documents with the clerk of court in the county in which either you or your current spouse reside. If you need to know which documents specifically to file, you may want to speak with an attorney. Best of luck with your continued medical treatment and the annulment if you choose to proceed down that road.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

I received a vasectomy prior to my marriage; it was a demand of my current wife that I receive one. This technically makes me impotent, right? Does this fit the annulment criteria? We have been married for one year, and we both realize this was an unfortunate mistake (both the marriage and the vasectomy). Is this a legitimate way for us to split without having to go through the entire divorce process? This is a second marriage for both of us, and we obviously did not have any children during this time. If this is possible, how do I pursue it?