Asking For Return of Attorney Fees


#1

Dear Twiceloser:

Greetings. First, and I hate to say this, but often in life we get what we pay for. $750.00 is simply not enough to get a well drafted, personally tailored separation agreement. Now, the fee is still not an excuse for poor legal work. My suggestion is that you set up an appointment with the attorney to discuss the matter and ask him for the funds to be returned. Hopefully, he will realize his folly and return your funds. Thank you.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

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Dear Ms. Fritts:

Thanks for your prompt reply. I agree about getting what one pays for, but when a professional sets the fee for their services, I think one is entitled to a quality product. It was not like I said “What can I get for $750.”

I will pursue getting a refund of the $750, and just write off to experience the other $500 I wasted.

Thanks again. I am impressed by the professional replies given in this forum.

Twiceloser


#3

Thank you. This was just the kind word I needed today. Good luck getting your refund.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

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A kind word made your day better? You deserve each one you receive. Holding my hand only makes my hand warmer. Intelligent information is strength, and strength is what I need at this time of my life.

Darn, I haven’t been able to keep either of two wives with kind words, and kind deeds. Some days you have to step back, and laugh at yourself to help keep your sanity.

I hope your every tomorrow is better.


#5

Dear Twiceloser:

Thanks. Remember that generally we don’t lose people, but we change and they either are not changing with us or cannot understand the change. Sometimes people change in ways we don’t like, and therefore we are not mandated to stay with them.

Going through a divorce helps build all of your other relationships and makes one realize that we cannot take anyone in our lives for granted. Best of luck!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#6

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Dear Ms. Fritts:

You bring up an important point when you said “people change in ways we don’t like, and therefore we are not mandated to stay with them.”

I believe a man’s word is his bond. I’ve had several dealings over $50,000 on a handshake with persons I trust. Therefore I viewed my marriage vows not just as mere words, but a binding verbal contract.

My question of law is: Since our law recognises verbal contracts, are the marriage vows, administrated by an officer of the court, many times in front of a hundred witnesses, considered a legal verbal contract? Do you know if it has ever been tested in the courts?

Thank you,

Twiceloser


#7

Dear Twiceloser:

Yes, I am sure it has been tested, but remember that marriage is not solely a contract, but a committment. Sometimes contracts are legally broken (for example when situations change and enforcement would be unduly burdensome, etc.).

I wish you the best!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#8

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Would I be in the right to ask for the return of part of the fees that I paid an attorney who, in my opinion, didn’t provide me as much as any basic services in return for his fees?

This is a rather prominant attorney, who I had known for years. I paid cash up front for each visit. By the 3rd. or 4th visit, he had yet to read my Prenuptial Agreement. I was trying to negociate a settlement with my wife. I requested a Separation Agreement listing the terms agreed to as of that date, so I could go over it with my wife, who refused to go to his office. I paid $750 and was told it would be ready in two days. My personal information document was lost, so I had to fill that our again. Three weeks later I was still waiting, and in this situation, time was of the essence. When I finally received it, I called my wife and arranged to meet her. Then I read the Agreement. It had the grammer and puncutation of a 4th grader. Part of the intent was incorrect, like she go her car and my car.

I called him to complain, and he promised to call my wife and gets things back on track. I suggested he try to get her to agree to a sit down meeting, so maybe we could avoid a lot of bloodshed and tears.  Three weeks later he had not called, so my wife called him. He told her "I thought you'll had come to an agreement."  That was the last straw.  I fired him and demanded my file.  My wife hired an attorney.

Would it be proper to ask for the return of at least the $750 that I paid for the Separation Agreement.  If so, what would be the best way make my demand?  Should I send a Certified letter or something like that?  If he refuses, what course do you recommend I follow?

Thanks for your answer, and for the valuable service you provide to those in need.