Not Mine


#1

Dear TSST:

When you are requested by the state of North Carolina, or your ex spouse, to pay child support you must immediatley request a paternity test to establish the child is not yours.

I am sorry to hear that you had this situation affect you, but I am sure you can understand how the child feels. Just make sure that you do not push the child away due to their biological genes if you still love them. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

Janet,

I was originally divorced in Nevada and she moved and changed jurisdiction to NC. We haven’t been to court or had any changes to the support order since 1995 (Nevada). I no longer live in Nevada. I still love him and want to have a relationship with him. She on the other hand doesn’t want me to have a relationship, only a source of income, and has made it difficult. She has told me that when he turns 18 (and no longer for support) she will tell him I’m not his dad. That’s in about 4 years.

As you can tell, I don’t have any problems with him and supporting him, but feel that this will be a disaster in the long run. My only problem is with her.

Thanks for your first reply.

TSST


#3

Dear TSST:

Greetings. I suggest that you contact a child psychologist and ask them the best way to let the child know the truth. Take control back and decide when you will tall him yourself. Then, tell him and let him know what a great person he is and how you are glad to have had the opportunity to shape and mold his life.

I agree, she is not acting in any manner which would be helpful for her son, but you can only determine your own actions in life. Best of luck!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

Janet,

Thanks for the suggestion. I wish I could have used it, but I just found out that she told him yesterday. He called and said he was ok with it and I told him that I love him unconditionally and am proud to be a part of his life and wish to continue. He said he understands and wants this. He did comment on me raising him and being there for him. I hope he’s really ok with this and hope he can cope with all of this. I still plan on seeking some help with a professional as you suggested.

Once again, thanks.


#5

Dear Tsst:

You are a wonderful parent. Don’t forget to talk to a professional for yourself also. You may have some feelings of loss associated with this, since the biological tie you thought was there is not. Just keep being there for your son, and never stop calling him your son, and things will work out fine. Best of luck!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#6

I’ve been divorced and found out one I am not the real father of one of the kids. I know who the real father is. Does anyone know what, if anything, can be done so I won’t have to pay child support for a child that is not mine.