Parental alienation


#1

Dear mal,

I would contact an attorney and put your children in therapy as soon as possible.

Helena M. Nevicosi
Attorney with Rosen Law Firm

4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
919.787.6668 main phone
919.256.1665 direct fax

10925 David Taylor Drive, Suite 100
Charlotte, North Carolina 28262
704.644.2831 main voice
704.307.4595 main fax

1829 East Franklin Street, Bldg 600
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
919.321.0780 main phone
919.787.6668 main fax

ROSEN.COM

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

Attorneys and therapists work well for those of us that have access to funds to pay for it, but you need to start keeping a daily journal of these activities, documenting and gathering proof that it is occurring. Once the other party finds out an attorney is involved, they may change their ways until the hearing is over, and then it starts all over agan. Then, if you try to bring it back up in court, you’ll just look like you’re being petty, or a sore loser, since you have no proof.
It wouldn’t be a bad idea to do a little research so you know what the signs are and what type of behavior to expect. Go to www.deltabravo.net , and under the articles section, there are a few articles on how to handle this and how to recognize it.


#3

I have looked at the site (deltabravo) and based on her behavior she (ex) demonstrates mild and some moderate parental alienation behavior. She has said things in front of the counselor (on another matter). We may have the counselor try and determine to what degree she has or has attempted to alienate them.


#4

Dear mal:

Greetings. If you suspect parental alienation, my suggestion if you are in ongoing litigation may be to request the appointment of a parent coordinator. This person can help you get to the bottom of the situation and try to fix the situation with both of you.

I can say that some, not most or all but some, of the parents that do alienate do not mean to do so, but cannot stop themselves or see their own behavior for what it is - harmful to the child. Good luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Law Firm

4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
919.787.6668 main phone
919.256.1665 direct fax

301 McCullough Drive Suite 510
Charlotte, North Carolina 28262
704.644.2831 main voice
704.307.4595 main fax

1829 East Franklin Street, Bldg 600
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
919.321.0780 main phone
919.787.6668 main fax

ROSEN.COM

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#5

If we suspect parental alienation is going on what should we do and what kind of steps should we take legally or with the children?