Residency Question


#1

My soon to be ex was military. We have been separated for over a year. Initially I moved back to S. Florida and in January I moved to Charlotte, NC. So I have been living here now for 9 months. My question is what do I need to show for residency? My drivers license and registration are all still in Florida. I have my lease in my name showing when I started living here. Can I use that or is license or id required for proof?

If so my options are to either wait the 6 months or file in Florida right?

TIA


#2

A person must live in NC for six months before they can file an action here. Bank account records, current bills to a North Carolina address in your name, pictures of you at various times in North Carolina are all ways that you can prove your residency. You should also get a drivers license, and register to vote in your county. Of course, you can also have witnesses testify on your behalf, if necessary. The only reason you would really need this information is if your ex contested your residency in North Carolina. Otherwise, you would simply take an oath that your testimony (or whatever document you might sign with your residency information) is true and accurate.


#3

Thank you!


#4

You’re welcome! Good luck!


#5

I would like to revisit this question about residency. I read somewhere that to file in a certain county in NC you needed to be a resident of that county at least 6 months prior. My husband and I have been residents of the county in which we plan to file for over 35 years. Currently we have been separated for 7 months and I am in the primary residence. At this time I wish to move to a smaller dwelling in another county. Will that cause us to have to begin anew our year long separation or in any way jeopardize my case since he is the one who moved out. We are hoping for a amicable settlement.


#6

The move won’t affect your separation period whatsoever. You can still file the divorce in your previous county, even if you’ve moved recently, if you’ve allowed the appropriate year and a day separation time.