Spouse self employed - not claiming REAL income


#1

Hi,
My husband is self-employed and I have always done our taxes (jointly). He gives me his information each year, and I input it into our turbotax software. I recently learned that he has not been reporting all of his income (in fact only about HALF of his real income). I have recently filed for separation (due to his drug abuse) and we have 1 daughter together. I am pursing primary custody. If granted, how will child support be determined? Will they use what he’s claimed on his taxes…or can I “expose” the information I recently learned? I got copies of all of his invoices from our computer (that’s how I determined his real income by printing them all out & manually adding them up myself). And if I did expose the real income, will I be held liable since I file his taxes (and we file jointly)?

His business normally claims an income of $20-$30k, when in reality he is making an average of $60,000. I have possesion of our home (making about $2,000/mth in utility/mtg payments by myself) and could use all the extra support I can get.

Thanks!


#2

Child support will be determined based on the North Carolina Child Support Guidelines, based on the parties’ adjusted gross income of the parties, the work-related child care costs, and medical insurance costs for the child. There is a child support calculator on the website which you may use to estimate support.

You may present the evidence you have obtained relating to his income. Any income that was unclaimed is subject to taxation, and you will be jointly liable for that tax debt.


#3

Child support will be determined based on the North Carolina Child Support Guidelines, based on the parties’ adjusted gross income of the parties, the work-related child care costs, and medical insurance costs for the child. There is a child support calculator on the website which you may use to estimate support.

You may present the evidence you have obtained relating to his income. Any income that was unclaimed is subject to taxation, and you will be jointly liable for that tax debt.