Subpeona


#1

Polygraph tests are generally only used in criminal cases, and generally are not admissible in any type of court action. However, when you file your court action, you can hold a deposition, where your attorney will ask them a lot of questions (separately) about the relationship, and if you have proof they have lied in the deposition, you can use the deposition in court to prove they are not trustworthy.

Good luck,

Shonnese D. Stanback
Attorney
The Rosen Law Firm
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
919.256.1534 direct voice
919.256.1667 direct fax
919.787.6668 main voice
919.787.6361 main fax
NCdivorce.com
email: sstanback@rosen.com

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

Shonnese,

thank you for your reply. However, I have to represent myself in court in this matter since I do not have the funds to pay an attorney. Do you have any idea what type of questions I should ask?

Like ask my husband to produce a hotel room recepit, when he was not a registered guest in a hotel and the other woman was?

Phone records? Witness out in public. My van in her garage and she would not release it to me, saying it was broken down and then he leaves a message that he is leaving her home?

His sister knowing that he was not spending the night at her house and unsure where he was? Can I question his sister too?

These two are not trustworthy, they both have lied and decieved many many people in this situation. I need to find some really good questions to ask these people…how do I prepare?

Where do I start?


#3

Dear freedom1:

Greetings. In a deposition you can ask any question which may lead to relevant information. You can ask him to provide information which he has control over. For questions to his girlfriend or his sister, you will need to depose them separately.

Remember that his fault is only an issue that affects the amount and duration of alimony. There is much more important information which you must prove at trial, such as the facts that he is a supporting spouse and you are a dependent spouse. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 200
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

Can I subpeona my husband and his new girlfiend to take a polygraph test to tell the truth, cause I know they are going to lie in court.

Is this legal?