Alimony Hassles and questions


#1

Dear Jenmccll:

Greetings. First, I am sorry to hear about the jerk leaving you like he has. It appears to me that he knew if he moved back in that you would effectively “condone” his cheating. Nevertheless, you are entitled to alimony and should retain an attorney as soon as possible. I know that the financial issue is pressing, but you will have to locate the funds to retain an attorney to assist you. Best of luck!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

First I would like to thank you for such a speedy response, however I do have a few more questions I hope you could be of some assistance with. I know there are no “magic formulas” when it comes to alimony, but I read that one of the determining factors would be if I was able to obtain a steady income. I am a college student who right now or at least for the next year could probably at least get a part-time job, but after the end of next year I would not be able to work at all due to the long hours I would be spending in clinicals. Would this be to my advantage? Also, I know attorneys all charge different fees, but what would be a general ball park figure I would need upfront? Again, thanks so much for all of your help!

Jennifer McCall


#3

Dear Jennifer:

Greetings again. You are correct that there are no magic formulas, but yes, your ability to work and have a salary/income is a factor the courts may look at. On the other hand, getting you through school is also important to the court, as this will increase your earning capacity, further decreasing your need for alimony. I think it helps you that you are in school.

Our firm charges flat fees, so you know exactly how much you will pay for the entire representation up front - no guessing or speculation. That being said, please use our fee calculator on our website. Let me know if you cannot find it. We often find that our litigation fees, because they are flat, are much less than other law firms that bill hourly and cannot guarantee the final cost of their work. Best of luck!

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney at Law
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
NCDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

Hi, I am 21 years old and have been married close to three years. After a seperation 8 months ago because he was cheating and abusive my husband promised me that he would work and I did not have to work so I could continue going to college so I let him come back. He told me today that he is going to leave and I have no job, no income and 800 dollars a month in bills I have to find a way to pay. I have no idea when he plans on leaving so who knows how long the ten dollars I have to my name at the moment will need to last. I have had to drop classes in the past because of our problems and due to financial aid circumstances if I drop anymore classes I will no longer be able to continue my education. I have no idea how to even begin my quest for alimony, I was hoping someone would read this and give me any advice so maybe I won’t be so blind.

Jennifer McCall