Consent Order Form


#1

From reading the consent order form; I think that would be used more for decreasing child support temporarily instead of permanently stopping child support due to a child aging out…though it does look a little easier than trying to modify the support amount.
You have a court order now and not just an agreement?
It’s very confusing…hopefully, the attorney will respond on this one.


#2

have you spoken to a child support officer? What we were told is that if both parties can agree to sign the consent order and settle on a specific amount of support it does not much matter what your income is. In our case we offered more than the amount she would have gotten if she went to court.


#3

There is still one minor child remainijng to support in this case. What I am proposing is that we simply half the payment. This may not be as much as she might get if we go to court, but it would keep her from having to actually appear, which is her biggest problem with the process.


#4

If the two of you agree to a child support amount the court will not invalidate that amount unless they believe there is something manifestly unjust about it. It should not be a problem if the worksheet does not show income for her.

P.S. Please feel free to bring up this or any other topic on our live call-in show every Wednesday at 11:00 a.m. EST. Visit radio.rosen.com/live for details

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Attorney with Rosen Law Firm

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#5

OK, I have been advised that instead of going back to court to modify my child support, now that one of my children is an adult, we can enter a consent agreement. I have the form, but have a serious question. It says that we have to attach a child support worksheet that reveals both of our incomes. The issue still exists that my ex has no little or no income because she has not worked a full time job in nearly 5 years. On the back of the form is a place where the court approves the consent order. If the worksheet shows that she has little or no income, isn’t it likely that the court would not approve the consent order? Also, it is going to be extremely difficult to impute income to my ex because I seriously doubt that she will be willing to reveal to me her exact income that she may bring in per month so we can enter that into the worksheet in the first place. Neither of us can afford an attorney, and she has stated time and time again that she does not want to go back to court because she lives 150 miles away from the county where the divorce took place. What can I do at this point to see that the consent order is accepted?