Just when I thought I saw light at the end


#1

Dear alljams:

Greetings. My advice is to hire a financial expert, who can make sense out of the piles of paper work which you have for the judge and sound much more credible then you will when they say the store was losing money and needed to be closed. You need to do this ASAP though, because the pre-trials are completed and experts should have already been disclosed. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#2

Thanks so much for the info…The only “financial expert” I can think of would be the accountant that did the taxes and financial statements for both stores…But this is the same resource my ex received her information…Would it be a problem, since the same info would be used by both sides ? Thanks…


#3

Dear alljams:

That may be the perfect person, if the accountant’s testimony would help you to establish that closing the first business and rolling it into the second one was for legitimate financial reasons. Also, if the accountant was involved in the decision - if you discussed it with the accountant - their testimony may be vital to you.

Also, you may want to talk to your attorney about creating an illustrative exhibit of the finances. Best of luck.

Janet L. Fritts
Attorney with Rosen Divorce
4101 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 500
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
RosenDivorce.com
919-787-6668

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service but a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action.


#4

of the tunnel, a MAC truck runs me over…

Hello again,

I know you don’t have time for long emails, so I’ll make this as short as possible…

Trial date is set.
Ex is now arguing over a consolidation of two convenience stores, 6 months before we separated. One closed, the other one bought inventory, etc. from the closed one. Closed store building was rented, along with most fixtures. There were still bills to pay (lease agreement on rented equipment,taxes, etc.) after store was closed, any money received from inventory, etc. was put into closed store account to pay them. When second store was sold, (per partial equitable distribution agreement) ex received pretty hefty amount. In pre-trial, ex’s attorney is saying closed store was worth 32,000.00, she didn’t get her share…My attorney says he will argue she has to prove it, but to get any evidence together in case…I have enough paperwork to heat a small apartment complex…What is “good evidence” ?? I want to prove what happened, but I don’t want to waste the judge’s time, or look like I’m moving in…Thanks, and as always your help is appreciated…